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- Description: sachin maharjan
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- Created On: Jan 25, 2010
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1. | Jun 24, 2014
There was an article in the Hunterdon Democrat about the fheerolders still not resolved on spending $3 million (on top of the $99 million budget) for a club house at a municipal golf course. Thats where we are, that they still think these are services that municipalities should provide. What percentage of the taxpayers get any use from the golf course, let alone a club house at the golf course? They spend hundreds of thousands landscaping parking lots every time they put something up, probably because the money goes to someone with an in. I have 3 libraries within 5 miles. The one in Flemington town, you'll never see 3 customers in there. The county library on Route 12 usually has more staff than customers. People don't use libraries any more. They buy the books they want to read and the kids use computers to do their research for school reports. All the schools have libraries, too. We probably provide pensions for everyone who works at these facilities that are of NO use to the great majority of town residents and not a necessity to anyone. Its so unfair.
2. | Jun 23, 2014
What if? (part 2) What if there is a guy who is on the isidne of state gov, and is also on the isidne at Goldman (doing biz with NJ). This guy sees the money flow on both ends of the pipe! What if he were a shrewd businessman (is this possibble? hmm ) and clever enough to formulate a plan? Wouldn't this be sort of the plan?1: Build trust while getting elected. Promise an end to corruption, pay to play, pension padding, waste, etc. This is an old script, but wait 2: Make friends with everyone. Give raises to union members, support the NJEA with more spending, even send rebates to homeowners. Be extra nice to high power players (like senate prez Codey). Act nice. Say the right things. Build trust.3: Get further support of the pigs' in Trenton by promising to secure the pension system. Most Trenton isidners are counting on multi-pensioned retirements, talk of bankruptcy actually raises an eyebrow, but the plan' fixes everything!4: No loose ends, (K. Katz, for one). Bury the bodies deep.5: Push the money button. There must be sufficient trust so the details of this toll/bond issue are never scrutinized. Trust is the key to bank.Today: There is some resistance, but it's ok. People are asking to raise the gas tax, cut spending, etc. Ok, Corzine can do all that, if that's what you want. Cut where it hurts, so they won't ask again. (They ought to be asking to see the bodies)6 months from now: Well, no surprise to anyone, there's still plenty of debt to go around. The economy has weakened. Payments to Highlands property owners are bankrupting the state. The pigs' are once again contemplating pension risk associated with bankruptcy. What to do?Aha! The secret plan is by now on the table and now ready to go, and is finally implemented.2 years: The deals are done, Corzine has a $ bil+ tucked away in overseas accounts. The state, inevitably, is facing bankruptcy anyway.So I ask you: What part of this scenario couldn't happen? Do you really trust a Wall St exec enough to blindly hand him $ 38 bil?Well?
3. | Jan 8, 2014
Superb intomrafion here, ol'e chap; keep burning the midnight oil.
4. | Jan 8, 2014
profiting off of the lack of EBT card security, and with ptoilicians receiving large campaign contributions from EBT processors like JP Morgan, little is likely to change anytime soon.
5. | Jan 6, 2014
So far, pretty much every once of those mary-j boallts around the country has failed, which surprises me a bit. It would be a boom for the economy in many, many ways to decriminalize the stuff..
6. | May 21, 2013
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7. | May 17, 2013
What if? (part 2) What if there is a guy who is on the inisde of state gov, and is also on the inisde at Goldman (doing biz with NJ). This guy sees the money flow on both ends of the pipe! What if he were a shrewd businessman (is this possibble? hmm ) and clever enough to formulate a plan? Wouldn't this be sort of the plan?1: Build trust while getting elected. Promise an end to corruption, pay to play, pension padding, waste, etc. This is an old script, but wait 2: Make friends with everyone. Give raises to union members, support the NJEA with more spending, even send rebates to homeowners. Be extra nice to high power players (like senate prez Codey). Act nice. Say the right things. Build trust.3: Get further support of the pigs' in Trenton by promising to secure the pension system. Most Trenton inisders are counting on multi-pensioned retirements, talk of bankruptcy actually raises an eyebrow, but the plan' fixes everything!4: No loose ends, (K. Katz, for one). Bury the bodies deep.5: Push the money button. There must be sufficient trust so the details of this toll/bond issue are never scrutinized. Trust is the key to bank.Today: There is some resistance, but it's ok. People are asking to raise the gas tax, cut spending, etc. Ok, Corzine can do all that, if that's what you want. Cut where it hurts, so they won't ask again. (They ought to be asking to see the bodies)6 months from now: Well, no surprise to anyone, there's still plenty of debt to go around. The economy has weakened. Payments to Highlands property owners are bankrupting the state. The pigs' are once again contemplating pension risk associated with bankruptcy. What to do?Aha! The secret plan is by now on the table and now ready to go, and is finally implemented.2 years: The deals are done, Corzine has a $ bil+ tucked away in overseas accounts. The state, inevitably, is facing bankruptcy anyway.So I ask you: What part of this scenario couldn't happen? Do you really trust a Wall St exec enough to blindly hand him $ 38 bil?Well?
8. | Jul 1, 2012
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9. | Jun 28, 2012
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10. | Jun 28, 2012
his still-secret asset monetization plan will do that. But how can you ask vrteos in the beginning of November to add another $650 million to the state's debt and then argue later that this debt is strangling the state and preventing implementation of much-needed programs? Perhaps this apparent contradiction would be easier to understand if vrteos could count on not being asked to approve another bond issue for a long time. But they can't. Voters' fears of profligate politicians are borne out by what happened with the stem cell program. Initially, the plan called for $100 million to construct a facility in New Brunswick, with another $50 million for equipment and technology. Then everybody wanted a piece. So lawmakers reverted to the Jersey solution. They agreed to spend $270 million out of the state budget on additional facilities in Belleville and Camden. Now for the bond issue. The original proposal was for $230 million for research grants. It's up to $450 million after add-ons. The $200 million for preserving open space, improving parks and buying land to protect water resources is intended to be a bridge loan until a more permanent source of funding can be identified. Corzine has suggested asset monetization could produce enough to cover future open space programs. If that's the case, why not wait a year? Making a case against preserving open spaces in the nation's most densely populated state is tough. Arguing against stem cell research while recognizing the hope it offers to millions is equally difficult. But New Jersey's taxpayers need to look at the numbers before walking into voting booths on Nov. 6. Get serious about state debtby Ali T Winston NJ.comNovember 18, 2007, 10:30PMGov. Jon Corzine told the League of Municipalities convention last week that it's time to get serious about fixing the state's substantial fiscal problems. These issues are not going to fix themselves. Now is the time to act, he said. That would have been a lot more reassuring if we hadn't heard it before. In his January 2006 inaugural speech, Corzine said, The time for procrastination is past. In his July 2006 speech at the start of the special legislative session dealing with property taxes, Corzine called for action, action, action. At the League of Municipalities convention last year, as the Legislature readied its tax reform proposals, Corzine said, Bold, bold, bold action in both relief and reform is what we need. And so now he says it is time to act. Consider this: While Corzine and legislators blather on about what they're going to do, the state has dug itself into an abyss of $38 billion in debt. Two issues that will greatly affect the state's debt should get immediate attention: the floundering proposal for state-supported stem cell research and the governor's cure-all asset monetization plan. First, the state's grandiose stem cell plans must be pared down. Rarely do vrteos give politicians a chance for a do-over. But with the rejection of the $450 million bond issue for stem cell research, vrteos did just that on Nov. 6. We opposed the measure because of the size of the borrowing a classic case of Trenton's overreach. The original proposal was for $230 million to provide research grants for a facility that the state would build. But before the Legislature got done, the figure had swollen to $450 million. In the meantime, plans for one research center in New Brunswick grew to include four satellite centers throughout the state. The price tag went from $150 million to $270 million. And never mind that vrteos who were asked to approve $450 million in bonds for the research grants were never told that the state was going to sell bonds, without voter approval, for the construction. (That was delayed after the vrteos spoke.) The stem cell issue is a primer on what's wrong with the state's borrowing practices. Which brings us to the second issue before the Legislature. Corzine says he intends to remedy New Jersey's debt problem with his asset monetization plan. He has been talking about it forever but has never spelled it out. He says he'll unveil details in January but has offered broad strokes such as cutting the state's debt in half by leveraging the untapped value of the Turnpike and Parkway to generate revenue. Leveraging, to us, sounds like another way of selling bonds, a way of borrowing. Quite correctly, Corzine has opted to forgo the temptation of ramming his complex monetization plan through the lame-duck Legislature, maintaining that such a revolutionary plan, which will affect future generations, deserves a full public debate. The hope is that the debate isn't endless. The debt keeps growing. (Cont.)